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1. Post extraction instructions

INSTRUCTIONS TO FOLLOW AFTER A DENTAL EXTRACTION OR ANY SURGICAL PROCEDURE IN THE MOUTH

2. Wisdom teeth management

Wisdom teeth are the third and last molars on each side of the upper and lower jaws. They are also the final teeth to erupt; they usually come in when a person is in their late teens or early twenties. Wisdom teeth that only partially emerge or come in crooked can also lead to painful crowding and disease. As teeth removed before age 20 have less developed roots and fewer complications, the American Dental Association recommends that people between 16 and 19 have their wisdom teeth evaluated to see if they need to be removed. Impacted wisdom teeth occur when one or more of your third molars have no room to enter the arch, are misaligned, or are growing at an angle that keeps them from fully erupting.

3. Pericolonitis

Pericornitis is a dental infection that occurs when there is not enough room in the mouth for a wisdom tooth to erupt. The wisdom tooth is partially erupted and the gum tissue covers a part of the top of the tooth. This allows food or plaque to become lodged under the gum tissue flap. If the area becomes infected, it is called pericoronitis and the gum tissue will become swollen and red.

4. Symptoms include a bad smell or taste in the mouth, discharge of pus from the gum near the tooth, swollen lymph lodes under the chin, muscle spasm in the jaw and swelling on the affected side of the face. You can treat it by rinsing with warm salt water and make sure that food is removed. An antibiotic may need to be given and oral surgery may be necessary to treat this oral care issue